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Appreciative Essays, Interviews or Articles

The Prominent Figures in Children’s Literature in Iran

Written by: Roohollah Mehdipoor Omrani

Hasanzadeh is a gifted writer for children and young adults who has a fluent, simple style but a realistic, visionary approach in his narration. Hasanzadeh is inclined to the teen’s literature, especially longer stories and novels.

Providing numerous images and viewpoints, Hasanzadeh looks for new styles in narration of stories. Accordingly, he practices a new style of narration in his book, entitled, “Charlie Game”.

He writes surrealistically in this story, mincing fiction with reality. In this story, he’s concerned with poverty, tramps’ lifestyles, and teen venders in his society. Hasanzadeh considers poverty, misery and runaway teens as stigma for the whole society in his short story, “Dishlamboo”. His unique innovation is in a section-by-section style of narration which corresponds with the road signs depicting the distance between cities on a bus journey.

The two stories, “Charlie Game” and “Dishlamboo”, have simple, straight-forward plots, but the rhythmic, harmonious diction and narration replaces the lack of conflict in the story. Hasanzadeh’s imagination and creativity look for innovations in narration. He uses the modern urban life symbols and estranges the routine social life to penetrate its apparent, hard shell to discover its real kernel.

Appreciative Essays, Interviews or Articles

About the novel, “This Weblog Has Been Transferred

Written by: Banafsheh Mahmoodi

Published in 2013

One of the most fantastic styles of writing is narrating a story at the heart of another. The reader will then read two stories simultaneously. Dorna is a teen girl who lives in Abadan. She finds a diary in a book shop storage which contains a love story. She is so excited about this story that she borrows the diary from the owner, who is in fact the shopkeeper. She uploads some parts of the story on her weblog, called, “The Keys”. The audience of the weblog will read about the story of Zal and his teen love.

Zal used to live and work in a Birds Shop when the war started. He was head over heels in love with his neighbor’s daughter, Fariba. But war separates them for a long time. Fariba’s mother who has decided to leave the city along with her daughters due to the war leaves the keys to their house to Zal so that he takes care of it. The keys make Zal stay in Abadan and wait for his beloved. Dorna shares this story with many people on her weblog, but it cannot make a change and find Zal’s beloved one.

The most important characteristic of the novel, “This Weblog Will Be Transferred”, is its innovative plot and form. In fact, the novel is presented in form of a weblog, and the comments the users have left on its pages.

The audience will get to know the main characters of the story through the posts Dorna leaves on her weblog. But the writer has used the common form of writing a novel where Zal’s diary is presented in series on the weblog. Since the narrator of these sections is Zal, the story is presented through his viewpoint; consequently, all the audience’s judgments and affections are affected by Zal’s ideas and emotions.

Farhad Hasanzadeh has stated that the novel is the result of thinking about the subject for seven years. He was going to write a story about weblogs and social networks and slept on the idea for seven years. He came up with Dorna’s story eventually. To check the attractiveness of his story, Hasanzadeh has uploaded some parts of the story on a weblog, called, “The Keys”, and has gathered the comments on the weblog and used them in some parts of the story.

Farhad Hasanzadeh, who has experienced war in his teens, has applied his own experiences in his novel, like what he did in “Moonlight’s Guest”, to make the story more realistic and believable. It is the story of a one-way love and the time which has gone. This Weblog Will Be Transferred, Ofogh Publishing Co., First published in 2013, 144 pages, 2000 volumes

Appreciative Essays, Interviews or Articles

Criticism on “Hasti”, the most read novel in Kanoon centers in 2011

Written by: Shadi Khoshkar

Hasti, the Girl Who Likes to Be Herself You read just one chapter of the book, and you will find out that you face a new character. You will meet Hasti, a Tomboy. She acts so much like boys that only the taxi driver does not think that she is a boy. At the beginning, even the reader might think that the narrator is indeed a naughty boy like many other stories.

Having a heroine has saved the story from being repetitive. It makes the story even more attractive. But the author has got a difficult task to make the character believable in all those ups and downs in her life. But it is not the whole story. When you are getting to know Hasti, a catastrophe occurs. The war between Iran and Iraq begins and makes Hasti and her family emigrate. I wonder whether the author has first created Hasti’s character and then decided to put her in the war zone, or he has decided to narrate the story of war right from the beginning and then dropped Hasti in the middle of it. In either case, war shatters both your mind from the focus on Hasti and Hasti’s life dramatically. War creates a new atmosphere to the whole story, which plays a vital role in the plot. Hasti is a bold girl who is not understood by his parents, especially his father. But now they are in the middle of a war, and everything has changed. It has drifted them away from home. They face new characters, such as their uncle who has decided to stay in the city and defend it, their grandmother who waits for her, and their grandfather who is afraid of the war. These are representatives of their groups in the society.

On the other hand, war can reveal the complexities of different characters, especially Hasti’s. In contrast to her father, Hasti is a brave girl and returns to her city to defend it.

Bicycle weekly magazine, 2011

Appreciative Essays, Interviews or Articles

“The Scorpions of the Bambak Ship” (Published by Ofogh publishing

house, 2008) Zari Naiimi, Bicycle Magazine

Although the novel does not have a nice title, the adventurous story involves a gang called, “Scorpions” and is narrated by Khaloo, a teenager from Abadan. Khaloo and his friends, Shokri, Mammad, and Manoo, have made up a gang, called, “Scorpions”.

The moment the Scorpions are introduced in the first chapter, you cannot put the novel down. Although the first chapter is set in the grave yard in the middle of the night in horror among the dead, these four teens like wandering ghosts haunt both the grave yard and the audience’s mind. Khaloo narrates, “You have to recruit in the Scorpions if you want to feel like heavens. Now that I am writing I am unable to enter into the gang in the introduction. I cannot separate some parts of Khaloo, Shokri, Mammad and Manoo’s dialogue to show them who they are. But it is what I am looking for: a sheer author, a writer who just writes and narrates the story.”

In Farhad hasanzadeh’s novel, it has happened. He just writes and Khaloo narrates the story. The author just writes the story. He does not hide behind Khaloo, Shokri or the scorpions. He stands aside.

The scorpions talk for themselves. That makes all the parts of the novel attractive, adorable and at times humorous. It is not the humor made by the author; rather, it is the humor which runs throughout the teens’ lives in their sentences, machine-talks, looks, glances, and interpretations, like the way he looks at his father and his snoring or the story he narrates from the revolution time.

Humor runs in the air in the context of the whole story. You can smell it in all parts of the story, even Khaloo’s chattiness is not boring or annoying. That is what I call the delicious taste of happiness. Life is great when you can taste the happiness through the pages of a novel or a story, chew it under your teeth like pomegranate seeds and swallow its syrup. I do not exaggerate. I truly believe that a story can be a piece of the heaven, don’t you?

Appreciative Essays, Interviews or Articles

Gallope (Published by Kannon) Ali-allah Salimi,

Fars News

 “Gallope”, a collection of short stories, contaisn three fanciful stories, which raises some philosophical questions and queries for children’s inquisitive minds. While simply stated, it deals with extremely complicated issues. The collection is notable from various aspects. First of all, one of the principles of children’s stories is to write in simple language, which is observed in this book.

The next point is to demonstrate childish fancies and imaginations which exist in all the stories of this collection, beautifully merged with a poetic outlook, creating a fantastic atmosphere which is quite attractive to their young audience.

Another important characteristic of these stories is to present deep philosophical concepts in simple childlike language. In the middle of fanciful narration of the stories, simple philosophical questions intrigue children’s minds.

In the first story of the book, ‘Gallope’, a naughty foal painted on a painting on the wall feels imprisoned in the frame and would like to set free. He gallopes here and there and shakes the frame of the painting so hard that it falls off the wall. The golden frame along with the painting and the foal falls on the ground and the story ends there, but there is still a question put forward to the young audience. In the last paragraph, you will read, “The niddle on the wall did not stand all those shakings and movings and was loose then. The hammer was deeply asleep. The niddle finished all the weight and the story there with a tiny move.” A few lines later, you will be asked, “The golden frame is broken and thrown away in the basement, but what has happened to the foal?”

Naturally, the young audience would wonder where the foal is. The answer to this last question could be different for different people who read this story. The open ending of the story has been designed to have such a wide range of answers. The most optimistic answer to the question, which might be even the simplest and the most available one, is that the foal has reach its wish and has set free when the golden frame fell down and broke. The author, however, has not reassured the audience about this simple response and has let the children have their own interpretations as well to end the story in any way they would like to. Children prefer this ending more nowadays.